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Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery |

Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery FREE

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2012;14(4):235. doi:10.1001/archfacial.2012.668.
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CONTEMPORARY REVIEW OF RHINOPLASTY

Patrick C. Angelos, MD, and colleagues offer a review of recent advances and trends in primary and functional rhinoplasty. Specific topics addressed in this review include outcomes in functional rhinoplasty and nasal valve repair, outcomes in septal reconstruction, malpositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, nasal tip contouring, osteotomies, grafting materials, and the use of computer imaging.

PERCEIVED AGE CHANGE AFTER AESTHETIC FACIAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES: QUANTIFYING OUTCOMES OF AGING FACE SURGERY

Nitin Chauhan, MD, FRCSC, and colleagues present the results of a retrospective study to quantify the amount of perceived age change that occurs following aesthetic facial surgery, including face- and neck-lift, upper and lower blepharoplasty, and forehead-lift. Preoperative and 6-month postoperative photographs of 60 patients who underwent aesthetic facial surgery were evaluated by blinded raters, who were asked to estimate the subjects' ages. The authors present data on the perceived age change associated with these aesthetic surgical procedures.

TOWARD A UNIVERSAL, AUTOMATED FACIAL MEASUREMENT TOOL IN FACIAL REANIMATION

Tessa A. Hadlock, MD, and Luke S. Urban, MS, describe the use of a novel computer software program designed to provide quantitative measurements of facial anatomic landmarks and facial movement. The authors used this automated tool to analyze facial photographs at rest and with movement of healthy subjects as well as a group of patients with flaccid facial paralysis. Results obtained by the automated software program were compared with those obtained by standard digital photographic analysis using Photoshop. The authors discuss the application of this process to facial nerve rehabilitation.

BIOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE FACIAL RETAINING LIGAMENTS

Michael G. Brandt, HBSc, MD, and colleagues present the results of an anatomic study to determine the biophysical properties of osteocutaneous facial retaining ligaments. Ten cadaveric hemifaces were dissected to identify and characterize the orbital, zygomatic, buccomaxillary, and mandibular osteocutaneous ligaments. Measured outcomes are presented, and the authors discuss these findings as they relate to common clinical signs of the aging face.

Madame de Pastoret and Her Son by Jacques Louis David, 1748-1825.

This issue's Highlights were written by Richard J. Wright, MD.

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