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Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery |

Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery FREE

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2012;14(6):384. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2013.406.
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ARTIFICIAL MUSCLE FOR REANIMATION OF THE PARALYZED FACE: DURABILITY AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY IN A GERBIL MODEL

Levi G. Ledgerwood, MD, and colleagues studied the biocompatibility of an artificial muscle made of an electroactive polymer in a gerbil model for potential future use in facial reanimation. The authors investigated the durability of the device and the inflammatory response to the implants as measured by capsule formation and inflammatory infiltrate. The future potential of artificial muscles to reanimate the paralyzed face is discussed as well as the barriers that need to be overcome to make this technology a clinical reality.

OUTCOMES FOLLOWING TEMPORALIS TENDON TRANSFER IN IRRADIATED PATIENTS

Garrett R. Griffin, MD, and colleagues investigated the outcomes and complications of temporalis tendon transfer for the treatment of facial paralysis in previously irradiated patients compared with their nonirradiated counterparts. The authors present data on postoperative movement of the oral commissure and comparisons of resting symmetry in patients studied. The implications of this study, when considering temporalis tendon transfer in previously irradiated patients, are discussed, including postoperative expectations and possible complications.

SUBJECTIVE AND OBJECTIVE IMPROVEMENT IN BREATHING AFTER RHINOPLASTY

Richard A. Zoumalan, MD, and Minas Constantinides, MD, present the results of a retrospective study investigating the effects of septorhinoplasty on subjective and objective measures of nasal patency. The authors present data on nasal patency preoperatively and postoperatively as measured by acoustic rhinometry as well as subjective measurements of nasal patency based on a Likert scale. Patients are subdivided and analyzed based on the severity of obstruction and the procedures performed during septorhinoplasty (ie, spreader grafts, osteotomies). They discuss the implications of septorhinoplasty on nasal patency and the effect of various procedures performed on postoperative acoustic rhinometry.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN AESTHETIC RHINOPLASTY: A SURVEY, CRITICAL ANALYSIS, AND REVIEW

Kian Karimi, MD, and colleagues offer their results of a survey presented to American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery fellowship directors and fellows consisting of 15 clinical vignettes covering various ethical considerations in aesthetic rhinoplasty. The responses of both fellowship directors and fellows are shared as well as comparisons between the 2 groups. They discuss the ethics of aesthetic rhinoplasty and possible explanations for differing responses to the survey based on how far along a given surgeon is in his or her career.

This issue's Highlights were written by Cody Koch, MD, PhD.

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