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In This Issue of JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery |

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JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2014;16(5):301. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2013.1725.
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RESEARCH

Behrad B. Aynehchi, MD, and colleagues reviewed 50 consecutive patients who underwent face-lifts without perioperative celecoxib and then analyzed a similar prospective cohort of 50 patients who underwent face-lifts and who received a preoperative and postoperative regimen of celecoxib for face-lift procedures. Both groups had similar demographic characteristics. Pain intensity, opioid consumption, and nausea were significantly lower in the celecoxib group. The authors conclude that some of the adverse effects of opioids can be avoided by using preemptive celecoxib.

Sung Bu Lee, MD, and Yong Ju Jang, MD, reviewed a retrospective series of 169 patients who underwent rhinoplasty to correct a deviated nose with nasal obstruction. Eighty-four patients had extracorporeal septoplasty (ECS), and 85 age- and sex-matched controls underwent in situ septal correction (ISC). Analysis of surgical outcomes in the 2 groups demonstrated that ECS is a useful technique for markedly deviated noses and that it has aesthetic outcomes similar to those of ISC. Functional outcomes were superior with ECS.

Timothy M. Haffey, MD, and colleagues describe an anatomic study to analyze the use of the angular artery and vein as recipient vessels in free-tissue transfer. The angular artery has been widely used in rotational, pedicled, and interpolated flaps for facial reconstruction of all types. They found consistent anatomic relationships and the caliber sufficient to use the angular artery and vein for microvascular anastomosis.

Steffen U. Eisenhardt, MD, and colleagues discuss an innovative technique to salvage failed free muscle transfers performed for facial reanimation. In this series, 3 free muscle transfers out of 21 transfers failed. To salvage the muscle, the authors coapted the neural pedicle from the cross facial nerve graft to the masseteric nerve. All 3 patients had good results and good symmetry between the operated and healthy sides. This is an appropriate salvage procedure.

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