0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Editorial |

Thank You on Behalf of JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery FREE

John S. Rhee, MD, MPH1
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, MCW Clinic at Froedtert West, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(6):396. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2015.1654.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

During the course of this inaugural year as the new editor of JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, I have shared my vision for the journal, introduced new article categories, and discussed the importance of striving for the highest level of evidence that is ethically and practically possible in our clinical studies.13 In my last editorial,4 I described our commitment to publish articles with the most “impact,” as measured by citations, downloads, and altmetric score. We are fortunate to attract the works of some of the brightest scientific minds in our specialty. With approximately 300 submissions per year, the process from manuscript receivership to acceptance to publication can be challenging.

I would like to extend my sincere thanks to all authors who submitted their manuscripts to be considered for JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery this past year. There is an implied trust that the peer-review process is fair and just, and that if revisions are asked for, these requests are made in the spirit of quality improvement and collegiality. We are so fortunate to have a cadre of thoughtful and scholarly reviewers who truly embrace the true spirit of peer review in the most professional and constructive manner.

In this issue, we publish a list of the reviewers who reviewed during the academic year of July 2014 to June 2015. The comments and recommendations from these reviewers were indispensable to the peer-review process and helped us in the goal of showcasing the best science of our field presented in the most relevant, clear, accurate, and ethical manner. The 15 names that are asterisked are those reviewers who reviewed 4 times or more during this annual time frame. Please join me in acknowledging these “top reviewers” as their service and time investment was exemplary.

Finally, I would be remiss not to specifically thank my fellow associate editors, editorial board members, and section editors for their guidance, support, contributions, and shared vision of making this journal truly a gem. Also, the powerful engine that is unseen from the outside is the tireless and quality work of the JAMA Network editorial staff starting with Sue Bickler, the journal’s editorial assistant, to the many wonderful staff at the JAMA Network headquarters in Chicago. These are the special persons that make the magic happen from manuscript submission to acceptance to publication with all of the accompanying special features that make the journal come to life.

Thank you for the honor of reviewing the best science of our specialty and on behalf of the entire JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery team, I wish you a wonderful holiday season and I look forward to an even brighter year in 2016!

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Corresponding Author: John S. Rhee, MD, MPH, Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, MCW Clinic at Froedtert West, 9200 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (jrhee@mcw.edu).

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

REFERENCES

Rhee  JS.  Faces of change: passing of the torch in JAMA Facial Plastic SurgeryJAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(1):7.
Link to Article
Rhee  JS.  The JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery clinical education blueprint. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(3):167-168.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Rhee  JS.  Evidence and quality initiative: moving beyond levels of evidence. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(2):80-81.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Rhee  JS.  High-impact articles: citations, downloads, and altmetric score. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(5):323-324.
PubMed   |  Link to Article

Figures

Tables

References

Rhee  JS.  Faces of change: passing of the torch in JAMA Facial Plastic SurgeryJAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(1):7.
Link to Article
Rhee  JS.  The JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery clinical education blueprint. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(3):167-168.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Rhee  JS.  Evidence and quality initiative: moving beyond levels of evidence. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(2):80-81.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Rhee  JS.  High-impact articles: citations, downloads, and altmetric score. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2015;17(5):323-324.
PubMed   |  Link to Article

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

795 Views
0 Citations
×

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

See Also...
Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Jobs