0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery |

Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery FREE

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2009;11(4):220. doi:10.1001/archfacial.2009.48.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

THE “MIDFACE-LIFT” AS A MISNOMER FOR CORRECTLY IDENTIFYING PROCEDURES DESIGNED TO LIFT AND REJUVENATE THE CHEEKS AND MALAR REGIONS OF THE FACE

A deepened nasolabial fold and a malar ptosis are 2 signs of midfacial aging. Many surgeons argue that standard face-lifting techniques fail to adequately address these features of midfacial aging, and a number of midface-lift techniques have been developed and coined. E. Gaylon McCollough, MD, and colleagues reviewed the cases of 53 patients who underwent a standard temporal cheek-lift with superficial musculoaponeurotic system suspension and imbrication from 2005 through 2007. They contend that this classic technique is effective at rejuvenating the cheek, nasolabial fold, and corner of the mouth, and that a separate, unique midface-lift procedure is not required.

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Portrait of Adelaide Christina Meyer, 1913, by Childe Hassam (1859-1935).

Graphic Jump Location

PROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF OUTCOMES AND COMPLICATIONS OF 300 CONSECUTIVE MICROVASCULAR RECONSTRUCTIONS

Microvascular free tissue transfer for the reconstruction of head and neck defects has been found to be extremely reliable, with success rates upward of 98%. However, patients who undergo microvascular reconstruction of head and neck defects are at risk for clinically significant perioperative complications. To help determine predictors of these complications, Michael J. Nuara, MD, and colleagues performed a prospective analysis on 300 consecutive microvascular free tissue transfer head and neck reconstructions, stratifying patients into groups based on preoperative comorbidity. They reported a 98.6% overall complete flap survival rate and found that patients with diabetes mellitus or a history of surgery or radiation had a clinically significantly increased risk of postoperative cervical wound complications.

THE UTILITY OF ULTRASOUND IN THE EVALUATION OF SUBMENTAL FULLNESS IN AGING NECKS

The accumulation of submental fullness and blunting of the cervicomental angle are defining features of the aging neck. This aging process is contributed by the changes in subcutaneous fat, subplatysmal fat, and platysma muscle as well as the digastric muscles. Choosing the most appropriate treatment option for aesthetic refinement of the neck can be challenging because of the limited ability to predict the relative contribution of each submental component on physical examination alone. Grigoriy Mashkevich, MD, and colleagues used high-frequency ultrasound to delineate the submental anatomy in 10 patients, demonstrating that it can be a useful adjunct for assisting the surgeon in deciding whether to perform an open or closed submentoplasty for the correction of age-related submental ptosis.

GRADUATED APPROACH TO REFINEMENT OF THE NASAL LOBULE

Excessive width of the nasal lobule is a frequent complaint of many seeking rhinoplasty consultation, and refinement of the nasal tip offers one of the greater challenges to the rhinoplasty surgeon. Lucas G.Patrocínio, MD, and colleagues reviewed over 600 rhinoplasties performed at their institution from 2003 through 2006 and present a graduated approach to refinement of the nasal tip lobule with the following 7 techniques: (1) no surgery needed, (2) interdomal breakup, (3) cephalic trim, (4) domal sutures, (5) shield tip graft, (6) vertical dome division, and (7) replacement of the lower later cartilages. With this approach they achieve high patient satisfaction with a revision rate of 5.6%.

This issue's Highlights were written by Amit Bhrany, MD.

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Portrait of Adelaide Christina Meyer, 1913, by Childe Hassam (1859-1935).

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

243 Views
0 Citations
×

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs