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Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery |

Highlights of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery FREE

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2007;9(3):160. doi:10.1001/archfaci.9.3.160.
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RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE FARRIOR TECHNIQUE FOR OTOPLASTY

The Farrior method, first published in 1959, relies on a combination of techniques, tailored to the patient's anatomy. Scott A. Scharer, MD, and colleagues present a retrospective review of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction of 75 patients who underwent a Farrior otoplasty during the past 15 years. Various aspects of the Farrior method are evaluated. Although no major complications were noted, the incidence of minor complications was higher than expected. Frequently, the combination of conchal cartilage reduction, cartilage scoring, and mattress suturing was used to achieve the desired outcome, with overall high patient satisfaction rates.

THE HEALING EFFECTS OF AUTOLOGOUS PLATELET GEL ON ACUTE HUMAN SKIN WOUNDS

David B. Hom, MD, and colleagues present a prospective, single-blind pilot study on the healing of dermal punch biopsy wounds after application of autologous platelet gel (APG). The effects of APG on wound healing were tested on healthy volunteers; each received 5 punch wounds that were treated with APG and 5 control wounds. The subjects were followed up closely for 6 months. Timing of wound closure, closure velocity, histologic findings, and growth factor profiles were examined. Enhanced wound closure and wound closure velocities were observed. Improved epithelialization and granulation formation were noted when the platelet count in the gel concentrate was 6-fold greater than the native intravascular platelet count. According to these findings, APG has the potential to improve wound closure and closure velocity of acute, full-thickness dermal wounds in healthy subjects. Future investigations may lead to treatments that would improve postoperative wound healing while preventing healing complications.

REHABILITATION OF LONG-STANDING FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS WITH PERCUTANEOUS SUTURE–BASED SLINGS

Daniel Alam, MD, presents a modified technique for minimally invasive static facial reanimation in which a suture-based lift is used in combination with Gore-Tex slings. The surgical technique is described with accompanying figures. Thirteen patients were evaluated over 4 years with a maximal 2-year follow-up. Complications such as implant extrusion or infection were not encountered during the study period. Excellent restoration of facial symmetry via re-creation of the nasolabial crease and suspension of the oral commissure to its normal position was achieved. The maintenance of symmetry after 2 years is encouraging, and we look forward to long-term follow-up results.

INJECTABLE TISSUE-ENGINEERED CARTILAGE USING A FIBRIN SEALANT

The ability to inject tissue-engineered cartilage capable of developing in vivo would have numerous implications in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Jinsoon Chang, MD, PhD, and colleagues investigated the use of commercially available fibrin sealant as a carrier vehicle for injectable tissue-engineered cartilage. The ability to contour the nasal dorsum of a rabbit via injection of chondrocytes seated in a semisolid fibrin glue matrix was examined. Although the augmentation of the nasal dorsum was not maintained over time, the study did confirm neocartilage formation along the tract of injection. No histologic evidence of inflammation or foreign body reaction was noted. Further studies and optimization of this process may provide a practical and minimally invasive tool for facial augmentation and reconstruction.

Jo, La Belle Irlandaise by Jean-Désiré-Gustave Courbet (1819-1877). Article

This issue's Highlights were written by Amir A. Rafii, MD.

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